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Rhiannon Hughes, Solicitor

Family Law

Direct Dial: 01242 268 024
Mobile: 07715 060 339

A bit about me

In the event of a divorce or family dispute, you might feel confused, with no idea where to turn. I can put you back in control of the situation, guiding you through to a resolution and helping you start again.

If you come to me for advice, I’ll give you the information, knowledge and confidence you need to make effective decisions. No matter what your circumstances, I’ll take the time to explain things in plain and simple language to help you to find a practical, fair solution.

In my spare time, I love to travel – I make it my goal to visit a new country each year. I was raised in North Wales and am a fluent Welsh speaker, and I’m also learning French and Spanish.

Want to know more?

Seek advice at the earliest opportunity. Knowledge is power and it will help you to make important decisions.

Try to tackle one thing at a time. Separation and divorce seems scary, but if you break it down and deal with one issue in turn, it’ll be more manageable.

Remember that this is your life and your process. If you’re not comfortable with something, speak up. It’s not a weakness to say you need help, time to think, or that you’re struggling to understand something.

How long will it take?

It depends on the case, but as a general rule, most court proceedings take a minimum of 4–6 months to resolve. If it’s highly contentious and has to progress to a final hearing, the average is 6–12 months.

Will I have to go to court?

My advice is always that court is a last resort. I always try to get the best outcome through negotiation, as this is often less costly and far less stressful. If this isn’t possible, I’ll explain the court process and help you understand the cost and likely outcome. Should you need to go to court, you’ll be represented by a member of our team.

How should we deal with arrangements for the children? Where will they live?

The arrangements for children will be determined by what is in their best interests. Parents are best placed to make that decision and I would always encourage you to discuss these arrangements with the other parent. I appreciate it’s not always easy, but methods such as mediation can help you deal with it amicably.

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